DMP Low-Hanging Fruits

In my experience as an Adobe Audience Manager consultant, I have noticed that many clients need a lot of hand-holding at the beginning when working with this DMP. Coming from the Web analytics world, this was a bit of a surprise to me at the beginning. I remember when I started an Adobe Analytics project I worked on 6 months ago, one of the client teams had a spreadsheet with 138 requirements… and that was only one of the teams involved. They knew exactly what they needed from the tool, which made my life easier. However, this is rarely the case in an AAM project.

In order to get some quick wins, we recommend to start with the low-hanging fruits. For your first few campaigns, do not try to create very complex rules for segments. Instead, think about easy rules that only require online behaviour. Here are a few of them:

  • Exclude customers from prospecting campaigns. This is probably the easiest case and the one that makes most sense: stop showing prospecting ads to users that are already customers; you are 99% sure they are not going to convert. This is as simple as creating a segment with customers and send it to the DSPs. Then, using the exclusion capabilities of the DSPs, exclude the visitors in that segments from the prospecting campaign. One of my customers had a drop of about 20% in the cost per acquisition just using this technique. If you use AAM with Adobe Analytics, here you have a few examples of the traits you can use to detect that a visitor is a customer:
    • The log-in event has been fired: (c_events contains “eventX”)
    • If you are capturing the CRM ID in an eVar or prop, then something as simple as (c_evarX/c_propY matchesregex “.+”) should do the trick
    • Any page of the private section (e.g. c_pagename == “my:private:area”)
    • Depending on what you sell, it can be as simple as users who have purchased something: (c_events contains “purchase”)
  • Include only local visitors or exclude non-local visitors. Very similar to the previous case, if you have a business that only sells locally, you do not want to waste any money on banners shown to visitors that come form regions where you are not going to delivery your goods. In AAM, this is very easy with geotargeting with platform-level keys.
  • Retargeting abandoned baskets. For all of those products that provide you with a high margin, you can create segments with users who have abandoned the basket with those products in it. You then create very specific retargeting campaigns using these segments. The segments will formed of two traits: “Add to basket – <product id>” AND NOT “Purchase – <product id>”
    • Add to basket: (c_events contains “scAdd” AND c_products contains <product id>)
    • Purchase: (c_events contains “purchase” AND c_products contains <product id>)
  • Up-sell or cross-sell. Target customers that have recently purchased certain products, customers who your experience (or your Web analytics data) shows that they are very likely to convert again. This is as simple as the previous example: (c_events contains “purchase” AND c_products contains <product id>)
  • Frequency capping. If a user has seen a campaign more than X number of times, stop showing the campaign to him. You need to decide which is the optimal X, but we all know that after a certain amount of times, if the user has not clicked on a banner, it is very unlikely that he will do it in the future. In AAM, you would use the frequency and recency capability of the segment builder.

What do you think about these initial segments? Any other segments you would recommend as low-hanging fruits?

 

When to use and when NOT to use DTM

A while ago, a customer requested a call with me to discuss one issue. Usually, I get more technical questions, but this time, he wanted to have my input regarding something completely different. The developers had realised that they forgot to include a JavaScript library in the website and they could not add it immediately, due to code freeze. They thought of an alternative solution: load it through DTM. My customer, from the marketing department, was not sure whether this was possible or acceptable and, therefore, wanted to know my point of view.

I must admit that, initially, I was a bit perplexed and did not know exactly what to reply. This was the first time I received this question and I had never thought about it. However, I quickly came with a proper answer and this is what I suggested. It must be noted that this is my personal perspective, not Adobe’s.

In order to reply to this question, you must first think about governance. Who manages DTM? Who owns DTM in the company? What is the purpose of using DTM? I think that DTM is a marketing tool, managed by the marketing department, used to deploy marketing tags in a website. So, if the new piece of code that needs to be added to DTM is requested by the marketing department, then it will probably make sense to use DTM; on the other hand, if it is the IT department requesting the addition, I would recommend against using DTM for it.

Technically, it is possible to deliver any JavaScript (and even HTML) through DTM. However, the fact that it is possible does not mean that it should be done. Think about the following questions when adding a piece of JavaScript that was not requested by the marketing department: who owns that piece of code? who updates it? who fixes it if stops working? who is to blame if it is inadvertently removed? what happens if DTM is removed? The marketing team will not want to take any responsibility of code they do not even understand.

So, to summarise, from my point of view, here you have some cases that are suitable for DTM and cases that are not:

  • In DTM:
    • Web Analytics tags (like Adobe Analytics)
    • Optimisation code (for Adobe Target, for example)
    • DMP tags (AAM also has a module in DTM)
    • Third party re-marketing tags
    • On-site surveys
  • Not recommended in DTM:
    • Generic JavaScript libraries (for example: jQuery)
    • Website functionalities (chats, UI effects)
    • Code that needs to be executed in a very specific location of the page (i.e. not at the top or the bottom)
    • CMS libraries

Can you think of any other case that would fit in one or the other case? If so, please, leave a comment!